SLOW + FASHION—an Oxymoron—or a Promise for the Future …?

@article{Clark2008SLOWF,
  title={SLOW + FASHION—an Oxymoron—or a Promise for the Future …?},
  author={Hazel B. Clark},
  journal={Fashion Theory},
  year={2008},
  volume={12},
  pages={427 - 446}
}
Abstract Conceptually, the slow food movement provides the point of departure for this article, which asks if the slow approach can offer a sustainable solution for fashion. Three “lines of reflection” are addressed: the valuing of local resources and distributed economies; transparent production systems with less intermediation between producer and consumer; and sustainable and sensorial products that have a longer usable life and are more highly valued than typical “consumables.” Each is… 
Inclusive Fashion—an Oxymoron—or a Possibility for Sustainable Fashion?
Abstract Cheap and accessible fashion from large retailers has, over the last decades, been thought of as a “democratic” form of consumerism. While embraced by masses of people with substantial
Inclusive Fashion—an Oxymoron—or a Possibility for Sustainable Fashion?
AbstractCheap and accessible fashion from large retailers has, over the last decades, been thought of as a “democratic” form of consumerism. While embraced by masses of people with substantial
Slow + Fashion – Women’s Wisdom
Abstract Building on ideas I first published in 2008 as, “Slow + Fashion - An Oxymoron or a Promise for the Future…?”, this paper brings new insights to the value of a slow approach to fashion. The
Sufficient Desire: The Discourse of Sustainable Luxury
Luxury and sustainable fashion goods are like any consumer product; they are material culture, laden with meaning beyond their utility. The value of a fashion good—whether luxurious, sustainable, or
Sustainable Markets
Examining the critiques of the current fashion system and alternative approaches to fast fashion reveal a growing awareness of the negative implications of mindless fashion production and
Fast Fashion, Sustainability, and the Ethical Appeal of Luxury Brands
Abstract The phrase “fast fashion” refers to low-cost clothing collections that mimic current luxury fashion trends. Fast fashion helps sate deeply held desires among young consumers in the
Digital Kimono: Fast Fashion, Slow Fashion?
Abstract Fashion in the twenty-first century is typically fast fashion, characterized by mass production, high turnover and goods designed for a short lifespan. The kimono appears to be the
Slow Fashion – Balancing the Conscious Retail Model within the Fashion Marketplace
Slow Fashion: An Invitation for Systems Change
Abstract In some circles, “fast” has become a proxy for a type of fashion that epitomizes ideas of unsustainability; yet high speed is not in itself a descriptor of unethical and/or environmentally
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