• Corpus ID: 89179279

SLEEPING AGGREGATIONS OF THE BEE IDIOMELISSODES DUPLOCINCTA (COCKERELL) (HYMENOPTERA : ANTHOPHORINI) AND THEIR POSSIBLE FUNCTION

@article{Alcock1998SLEEPINGAO,
  title={SLEEPING AGGREGATIONS OF THE BEE IDIOMELISSODES DUPLOCINCTA (COCKERELL) (HYMENOPTERA : ANTHOPHORINI) AND THEIR POSSIBLE FUNCTION},
  author={John Alcock},
  journal={Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society},
  year={1998},
  volume={71},
  pages={74-84}
}
  • J. Alcock
  • Published 1998
  • Biology
  • Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society
Males of the bee Idiomelissodes duplocincta roost in the evening together on the stems of desert shrubs during summer months in central Arizona. The size of the aggre gation can vary greatly during the few days to several months when a shrub is being used as a sleeping site. Some males return to the same plant for up to two weeks but show little site fidelity to a particular stem. When frequently-occupied stems are experimentally cut and moved to new sites in a shrub and replaced with other… 
Long-term male aggregations of Euglossa melanotricha Moure (Hymenoptera: Apidae) on fern fronds Serpocaulon triseriale (Pteridophyta: Polypodiaceae).
A communal dormitory of male orchid bees, Euglossa melanotricha Moure, was monitored over a one-year period, when they passed the night in the fronds of a Serpocaulon triseriale (Polypodiaceae) fern.
Female‐biased sleeping aggregations of Amegilla florea urens (Hymenoptera: Apidae)
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This work found female‐biased sleeping aggregations of Amegilla florea urens in populations on Iriomote Island and suggests that females used the sleeping place regularly but avoided a long stay with males.
Nests of Phacellodomus rufifrons (Wied, 1821) (Aves: Furnariidae) as sleeping shelter for a solitary bee species (Apidae: Centridini) in southeastern Brazil
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The Non-Use of Sleeping Substrate by the Sympatric Bees Amegilla florea urens and A. senahai senahai (Hymenoptera: Apoidea)
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It is suggested that single species aggregation would have an advantage for conspecifics to increase the night survival rate by sharing information such as predator attack.
The choosing of sleeping position in the overnight aggregation by the solitary bees Amegilla florea urens in Iriomote Island of Japan
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It is suggested that the purpose for sleeping in aggregations might be a dilution effect for nocturnal predation and that the females that finished both nesting and foraging quickly could choose the optimal positions in the aggregation when they arrived on the sleeping substrates.
Male sleeping aggregations of solitary oil-collecting bees in Brazil (Centridini, Tapinotaspidini, and Tetrapediini; Hymenoptera: Apidae).
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The sleeping roosts of the males of some oil-collecting bees of the genera Centris, Paratetrapedia, Lanthanomelissa, Monoeca, and Tetrapedia are reported on, as well as the host plants.
Congregation Sites and Sleeping Roost of Male Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini)
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It is reported for the first time the substrates used by stingless bee males for resting at night, that at least one species forms large sleeping roosts composed of hundreds of individuals, and that sleeping roos are not reused on subsequent nights.
Mating System and Sleeping Behaviour of the Male and Female Centris (Paracentris) burgdorfi Friese (Apidae, Centridini)
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In the evening, males do not use plants to spend the night, instead they aggregate in sleeping clusters inside old burrows in the nesting-emergence area while females sleep in groups on plants that provide the floral oil used in nest construction.
The endangered Iris atropurpurea (Iridaceae) in Israel: honey-bees, night-sheltering male bees and female solitary bees as pollinators.
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Honey-bees have the potential to reduce the amount of pollen available for plant reproduction, and to reduceThe amount of resources available to solitary bee communities if hives are permitted inside reserves, where the bulk of Oncocyclus iris species are protected.
A dense daytime aggregation of solitary bees lHymenopterac Apidaec Centridinir in the Lesser Antilles
TLDR
A dense daytime aggregation of thousands of bees was present on at least six successive days on a large Caesalpinia bonduc (Caesalpiniaceae) shrub on the island of Anguilla, Lesser Antilles, with unusual features of its persistence during daylight hours, the presence of multiple species, and the existence of females.
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The consistency of sleeping patterns exhibited by several species and the uniformity of sleeping position adopted by individuals suggest that each has a selective value, the nature of which requires further study.
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