SIGACT News Complexity Theory Column 76: an atypical survey of typical-case heuristic algorithms

@article{Hemaspaandra2012SIGACTNC,
  title={SIGACT News Complexity Theory Column 76: an atypical survey of typical-case heuristic algorithms},
  author={Lane A. Hemaspaandra and Ryan Williams},
  journal={SIGACT News},
  year={2012},
  volume={43},
  pages={70-89}
}
Heuristic approaches often do so well that they seem to pretty much always give the right answer. How close can heuristic algorithms get to always giving the right answer, without inducing seismic complexity-theoretic consequences? This article first discusses how a series of results by Berman, Buhrman, Hartmanis, Homer, Longpré, Ogiwara, Schöning, and Watanabe, from the early 1970s through the early 1990s, explicitly or implicitly limited how well heuristic algorithms can do on NP-hard… 
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