SEXUAL SELECTION CAN INCREASE THE EFFECT OF RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT—A QUANTITATIVE GENETIC MODEL OF POLYMORPHISM IN OOPHAGA PUMILIO, THE STRAWBERRY POISON‐DART FROG

@article{Tazzyman2010SEXUALSC,
  title={SEXUAL SELECTION CAN INCREASE THE EFFECT OF RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT—A QUANTITATIVE GENETIC MODEL OF POLYMORPHISM IN OOPHAGA PUMILIO, THE STRAWBERRY POISON‐DART FROG},
  author={Samuel J. Tazzyman and Yoh Iwasa},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2010},
  volume={64}
}
The variation in color pattern between populations of the poison‐dart frog Oophaga pumilio across the Bocas del Toro archipelago in Panama is suggested to be due to sexual selection, as two other nonsexually selecting Dendrobatid species found in the same habitat and range do not exhibit this variation. We theoretically test this assertion using a quantitative genetic sexual selection model incorporating aposematic coloration and random drift. We find that sexual selection could cause the… 

RAPID POPULATION DIVERGENCE LINKED WITH CO‐VARIATION BETWEEN COLORATION AND SEXUAL DISPLAY IN STRAWBERRY POISON FROGS

It is argued that changes in aposematic coloration may rapidly cause not only postmating isolation due to poorly adapted hybrids, but also premating isolation through shifts in mating behaviors.

Experimental evolution: Assortative mating and sexual selection, independent of local adaptation, lead to reproductive isolation in the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei

The results suggest that prezygotic isolation did not depend on drift or adaptation to divergent environments, but instead resulted from differences in sexual interactions within individual replicates, and that postzyGotic isolation can occur between populations even when only one population has greater fitness in its home environment.

Evolutionary drivers of polymorphic sexual signals in slender anoles

Slender anoles emerge as a promising system to address questions about parallel trait evolution and the contribution of signaling traits to speciation, and it is found that dewlap colors vary among but not within sites in A. fuscoauratus populations.

Evolutionary drivers of sexual signal variation in Amazon Slender Anoles

It is found that dewlap colors vary among but not within sites in A. fuscoauratus populations, and Amazon Slender Anoles emerges as a promising system to address questions about parallel trait evolution and the contribution of signaling traits to speciation.

Population expansion, isolation and selection: novel insights on the evolution of color diversity in the strawberry poison frog

The results support a major role for recent population expansion and reduced gene flow (from isolation on islands) in the diversification of color across populations.

Mating status correlates with dorsal brightness in some but not all poison frog populations

Overall the results imply that brightness differences among individuals of the same color morph may actually affect reproductive success in some populations of strawberry poison frogs.

No evidence for differential survival or predation between sympatric color morphs of an aposematic poison frog

The results suggest that general avoidance by predators of red and yellow, both of which are typical warning colors used throughout the animal kingdom, may be contributing to the apparent stability of this polymorphism.

AFLP genome scans suggest divergent selection on colour patterning in allopatric colour morphs of a cichlid fish

The correlation between outlier locus alleles and colour phenotypes in a genetic and phenotypic cline between two morphs showed that colour pattern differentiation did not result exclusively from neutral processes, and should be encouraged to be applied to studies of divergent selection in subdivided and recently expanded populations.

The evolution of polymorphism in the warning coloration of the Amazonian poison frog Adelphobates galactonotus

The relative contributions of selection, geographic isolation, and random genetic drift to the evolution of aposematic color polymorphism in the poison frog Adelphobates galactonotus, distributed throughout eastern Brazilian Amazonia are evaluated.

A captive breeding experiment reveals no evidence of reproductive isolation among lineages of a polytypic poison frog

A captive breeding experiment was used to assess the extent of reproductive isolation among three allopatric, genetically distinct O. pumilio lineages that differ in coloration, and found no evidence suggesting behavioural pre-zyGotic or post-zygotic reproductive isolation, indicating that isolation would not be maintained by intrinsic mechanisms in the event of secondary contact.

References

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