SEM investigations of the larval development of Imnadia yeyetta and Leptestheria dahalacensis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Spinicaudata)

@article{Eder2004SEMIO,
  title={SEM investigations of the larval development of Imnadia yeyetta and Leptestheria dahalacensis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Spinicaudata)},
  author={E. Eder},
  journal={Hydrobiologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={486},
  pages={39-47}
}
  • E. Eder
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Hydrobiologia
This paper presents a SEM documentation of the larval development of the two most abundant Austrian conchostracan species, Imnadia yeyetta (Limnadiidae) and Leptestheria dahalacensis (Leptestheriidae). As in several previously examined spinicaudatan species, five larval stages were documented: Nauplius 1, Nauplius 2, Metanauplius, Peltatulus, and Heilophore. Additionally, three postlarval stages of L. dahalacensis and the first larval instars of Eoleptestheria ticinensis and Limnadia… Expand

Figures from this paper

SEM studies on the early larval development of Triops cancriformis (Bosc)(Crustacea: Branchiopoda, Notostraca)
TLDR
The ontogeny of selected features such as trunk limbs and carapace is described, and the homologization of head appendages, follow the develop- ment of the feeding mechanism, and discuss trunk limb ontogenies are discussed. Expand
Larval development of Japanese 'conchostracans': part 1, larval development of Eulimnadia braueriana (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Spinicaudata, Limnadiidae) compared to that of other limnadiids
TLDR
The general morphology of the nauplius larvae of E. braueriana is much like those of the well-known Limnadia lenticularis and Eulimnadia texana Packard, including an elongate, lanceolate labrum, but the correspondence between the larval sequences of these species is not perfect. Expand
Larval development of Japanese 'conchostracans': part 2, larval development of Caenestheriella gifuensis (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Spinicaudata, Cyzicidae), with notes on homologies and evolution of certain naupliar appendages within the Branchiopoda.
TLDR
The larval development of Caenestheriella gifuensis (Ishikawa, 1895), a Japanese spinicaudatan 'conchostracan', is described by scanning electron microscopy, and it is suggested that this ontogeny reflects the evolution of antennae in the con chostracans. Expand
The larval development of an Australian limnadiid clam shrimp (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Spinicaudata), and a comparison with other Limnadiidae
TLDR
It is concluded that at least six naupliar stages belong to the limnadiid ground pattern and that from the last larval to the first postlarval stage, a significant change in morphology takes place. Expand
Nervous system development in Spinicaudata and Cyclestherida (Crustacea, Branchiopoda)—comparing two different modes of indirect development by using an event pairing approach
TLDR
The first indications of the evolutionary transformation which the Cladocera may have undergone from a clam shrimp‐like ancestor are given. Expand
Revision of the Extant Genera of Limnadiidae (Branchiopoda: Spinicaudata)
TLDR
Both molecular and morphological data strongly support eight genera of the spinicaudatan clam shrimp family Limnadiidae, two of which are new to science and one (Paralimnadia) that is resurrected. Expand
The Development of Phyllopodous Limbs in Leptostraca and Branchiopoda
TLDR
The data allow the conclusion that the branchiopod limb forms a three-lobed rather than an undivided endopod, and lends support to the idea that the tagmatisation of the malacostracan trunk into thorax and pleon is the result of a secondary subdivision of an ancestral crustacean thoracic region. Expand
Unraveling the origin of Cladocera by identifying heterochrony in the developmental sequences of Branchiopoda
IntroductionOne of the most interesting riddles within crustaceans is the origin of Cladocera (water fleas). Cladocerans are morphologically diverse and in terms of size and body segmentation differExpand
Ontogenic change in phototaxis of the clam shrimp Eulimnadia braueriana Ishikawa, 1895 (Branchiopoda: Spinicaudata)
TLDR
Photoresponse in nauplii, juveniles, and adult hermaphrodites of the clam shrimp Eulimnadia braueriana Ishikawa, 1895 was measured and showed an adaptive strategy in dispersion, foraging, predator avoidance, and in minimizing intraspecific competition. Expand
Spinicaudata Catalogus (Crustacea: Branchiopoda).
The Spinicaudata (spiny clam shrimp) are a large group of freshwater, bivalved branchiopod crustaceans in need of taxonomic revision. Herein, the extant Spinicaudata families and genera are definedExpand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES
Larval and post‐larval development of the branchiopod clam shrimp Cyclestheria hislopi (Baird, 1859) (Crustacea, Branchiopoda, Conchostraca, Spinicaudata)
TLDR
A comparison between Cyclestheria and the Upper Cambrian ‘Orsten’ fossil Rehbachiella kinnekullensis reveals a remarkable similarity in the endite morphology of the trunk limbs. Expand
Adaptation of Bathynellacea (Crustacea, Syncarida) to Life in the Interstitial (“Zoea Theory”)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the Bathynellacea arose by neoteny from a zoea-like ancestor (“Zoea Theory”), and the classical example of a group of crustaceans thought to have arisen by neOTeny, the Cladocera, is critically examined and found to be in need of reevaluation. Expand
Aspects of the post-larval life history of Limnadia stanleyana King (Crustacea : Conchostraca)
TLDR
A study of the life history permits description of some aspects of the growth and morphological variation of the species and the mean number of spines on telsons of animals from one pool is different from that of those from other pools. Expand
The Upper Cambrian Rehbachiella and the phylogeny of Branchiopoda and Crustacea
TLDR
This study on Rehbachiella supports the monophyly of the crown-group Crustacea and reveals that only the first maxilla was morphologically and functionally included into the crustacean head, while subsequent limbs were addted to the head in a stepwise manner and became modified separately within the different crustacea lineages, which is of great relevance when evaluating the relationships between these. Expand
Larval development and segment formation in the branchipod crustaceans Limnadia stanleyana King (Conchostraca) and Artemia salina (L.) (Anostraca)
TLDR
A primitive mode of development can be identified for the Branchiopoda and interpreted as a derived form of the developmental pattern of the Cephalocarida, which cannot be employed as a criterion of phylogenetic affinity in Crustacea. Expand
The Upper CambrianRehbachiella, its larval development, morphology and significance for the phylogeny of Branchiopoda and Crustacea
TLDR
The monograph on the 500 million-year-old Rehbachiella from the Upper Cambrian ‘Orsten’ of Sweden comprises a detailed description of its larval sequence and a discussion of functional and comparative aspects of its morphology and ontogeny. Expand
Phylogeny, evolution and classification of the Branchiopoda (Crustacea)
TLDR
A cladistic analysis of all branchiopod groups, using a total of 42 morphological characters, shows that the circumtropical Cyclesteria hislopi is the sole representative of a new conchostracan order, the Cyclestherida. Expand
Distribution and phenology of large branchiopods in Austria
TLDR
Differences in hydrology, temperature and water chemistry requirements may be reflected in local species compositions and species seasonal appearance. Expand
BRANCHIOPOD MONOPHYLY AND INTERORDINAL PHYLOGENY INFERRED FROM 18S RIBOSOMAL DNA
TLDR
It is proposed that the taxonomic heading “Cladocera” include a new taxon, Cyclesthera, equal in rank to the Gymnomera, which corroborates views based on morphological comparisons that the cladoceran lineage arose from a cyclestherid-like ancestor. Expand
Locomotion in Developing Artemia Larvae: Mechanical Analysis of Antennal Propulsors Based on Large-Scale Physical Models.
TLDR
A physical model of the swimming appendage of a larval Artemia was oscillated and translated through a tank of glycerine to determine how such a shape may be used to generate thrust at the intermediate Reynolds numbers at which it operates, suggesting that passive extension of setae can be influenced by relative limb and body speed. Expand
...
1
2
3
...