SEGREGATION AND STRATIFICATION: A Biosocial Perspective

@article{Massey2004SEGREGATIONAS,
  title={SEGREGATION AND STRATIFICATION: A Biosocial Perspective},
  author={D. Massey},
  journal={Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race},
  year={2004},
  volume={1},
  pages={7 - 25}
}
  • D. Massey
  • Published 2004
  • Sociology
  • Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race
Thirty years after the civil rights era, the United States remains a residentially segregated society in which Blacks and Whites inhabit different neighborhoods of vastly different quality. Given high levels of racial segregation and elevated rates of Black poverty, it is axiomatically true that African Americans will experience more neighborhood poverty than other groups. Moreover, because poverty is associated with crime and delinquency, they will also be exposed to far higher rates of social… Expand
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