Corpus ID: 210153011

SEA STAR DISEASE AND POPULATION DECLINES AT THE CHANNEL ISLANDS

@inproceedings{Eckert1999SEASD,
  title={SEA STAR DISEASE AND POPULATION DECLINES AT THE CHANNEL ISLANDS},
  author={G. Eckert and J. Engle and D. Kushner},
  year={1999}
}
In the summer of 1997, we quantified the incidence of wasting disease among multiple species of sea stars throughout the Channel Islands and adjacent mainland areas. The disease has been observed since 1978 during warmer water periods. Following the 1982-1983 El Niño, the disease and severe sea star population declines were observed, however, quantitative surveys of disease were not conducted. In our 1997 surveys, Asterina miniata and Pisaster giganteus were the species most severely affected… Expand

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