SCOLICA ENCHIRIADIS AND THE ‘NON-DIATONIC’ PLAINSONG TRADITION

@article{Maloy2009SCOLICAEA,
  title={SCOLICA ENCHIRIADIS AND THE ‘NON-DIATONIC’ PLAINSONG TRADITION},
  author={Rebecca Maloy},
  journal={Early Music History},
  year={2009},
  volume={28},
  pages={61 - 96}
}
  • Rebecca Maloy
  • Published 24 August 2009
  • Psychology
  • Early Music History
Although medieval plainsong is known as a primarily diatonic repertory, the presence of a ‘non-diatonic’ tradition was brought to light long ago in the work of Jacobsthal, Delalande and others. This essay considers some aspects of this practice that have not been fully examined in previous studies and explores their relationship to early medieval theory and pedagogy. In the solo verses of the offertory chants, large sections are displaced from the diatonic background scale, sometimes… 
2 Citations

References

SHOWING 1-6 OF 6 REFERENCES
Die Dasia-Notation
The version of Valenciennes 337 is transmitted in Brussels
    The currently accepted interpretation of the dasia, in Figure 1, was proposed shortly afterwards by Spitta
      This diagram is also found in a direct descendant of Pa 7212
      • Bibliothèque nationale, fonds Latin 7211: Analysis, Inventory, and Text
      • 1991
      This date is considerably later than Schmid's 'tenth or eleventh century
        In two sources, Mü 14372 and Mü 18914, the last three signs are position-based. The different text families are discussed in Phillips
        • 1965