Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

@article{Place2015RyanodineRF,
  title={Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.},
  author={Nicolas Place and Niklas Ivarsson and Tomas Venckūnas and Daria Neyroud and Marius Brazaitis and Arthur J Cheng and Julien Ochala and Sigitas Kamandulis and Sebastien Girard and Gintautas Volungevi{\vc}ius and Henrikas Pau{\vz}as and Abdelhafid Mekideche and Bengt Kayser and Vicente Mart{\'i}nez-Redondo and Jorge L Ruas and Joseph D. Bruton and A. Truffert and Johanna T Lanner and Albertas Skurvydas and H{\aa}kan Westerblad},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2015},
  volume={112 50},
  pages={15492-7}
}
High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the… CONTINUE READING
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