Rural proceduralists: an endangered species. Report of the Queensland Rural Indemnity Study, 1997.

Abstract

Surveys and interviews of a random sample of rural doctors in Queensland were undertaken to investigate the degree to which indemnity costs influence the types of practice and future plans of rural proceduralists. A survey of 135 rural doctors sought details of the procedural profiles, current indemnity status and the future plans of doctors presently undertaking procedures. Also under investigation was the degree to which concerns over indemnity related issues was likely to influence the continuing participation of these doctors in rural procedural medicine at current levels. The results indicate that the proportion of rural doctors in Queensland willing to offer procedural medicine is declining. Over the past 5 years, 52% of those surveyed had changed from procedural to non-procedural indemnity cover and of the 48% of doctors remaining, one-third indicated that they were considering such a change. Over 75% of current procedural doctors in the sample were able to identify an indemnity premium rate at which they would consider that procedural practice was no longer a viable option. Of the 104 respondents to the study, only 27 regard their status as totally stable with regard to long-term procedural practice regardless of indemnity costs.

Cite this paper

@article{Sondergeld1998RuralPA, title={Rural proceduralists: an endangered species. Report of the Queensland Rural Indemnity Study, 1997.}, author={S Sondergeld and Anna Nichols}, journal={The Australian journal of rural health}, year={1998}, volume={6 3}, pages={126-31} }