Running energetics in the pronghorn antelope

@article{Lindstedt1991RunningEI,
  title={Running energetics in the pronghorn antelope},
  author={Stan L. Lindstedt and James F. Hokanson and Dominic J. Wells and Steve D. Swain and Hans H Hoppeler and Vilma Navarro},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1991},
  volume={353},
  pages={748-750}
}
THE pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) has an alleged top speed of 100 km h−1, second only to the cheetah (Acionyx jubatus) among land vertebrates1, a possible response to predation in the exposed habitat of the North American prairie2. Unlike cheetahs, however, pronghorn antelope are distance runners rather than sprinters, and can run 11 km in 10 min, an average speed of 65 km h−1 (ref. 1). We measured maximum oxygen uptake in pronghorn antelope to distinguish between two potential… Expand
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