Rufinamide for the adjunctive treatment of partial seizures in adults and adolescents: A randomized placebo‐controlled trial

@article{Brodie2009RufinamideFT,
  title={Rufinamide for the adjunctive treatment of partial seizures in adults and adolescents: A randomized placebo‐controlled trial},
  author={Martin J Brodie and William E Rosenfeld and Blanca Vazquez and Rajesh C. Sachdeo and Carlos Perdomo and Allison Mann and Santiago Arroyo},
  journal={Epilepsia},
  year={2009},
  volume={50}
}
Purpose:  To evaluate efficacy and safety of adjunctive treatment with rufinamide 1600 mg twice daily in subjects aged ≥16 years with refractory partial seizures. 
A randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, parallel‐group study of rufinamide as adjunctive therapy for refractory partial‐onset seizures
Purpose:  Efficacy and safety of adjunctive rufinamide (3,200 mg/day) was assessed in adolescents and adults with inadequately controlled partial‐onset seizures receiving maintenance therapy with up
Rufinamide in children and adults in routine clinical practice
To explore the long‐term effectiveness of rufinamide in managing Lennox–Gastaut Syndrome (LGS), other epileptic encephalopathies, and intractable focal epilepsies in adults and children in routine
Rufinamide in refractory childhood epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox–Gastaut syndrome
TLDR
This is the first multicenter Italian experience with rufinamide as adjunctive drug in children, adolescents and young adults with refractory childhood‐onset epileptic encephalopathies other than Lennox–Gastaut syndrome.
Safety and retention rate of rufinamide in 300 patients: A single pediatric epilepsy center experience
TLDR
This work evaluated the use of rufinamide in a single pediatric center with a large cohort and long‐term follow‐up period and found it to be safe and effective in children with refractory epilepsy.
Factors determining response to antiepileptic drugs in randomized controlled trials. A systematic review and meta‐analysis
TLDR
Meta‐analyses of placebo‐controlled randomized controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs in refractory partial epilepsy represent a potentially important source of evidence to guide treatment decisions, but such indirect comparisons raise various methodologic issues that may hamper their relevance.
Exposure to rufinamide and risks of CNS adverse events in drug‐resistant epilepsy: a meta‐analysis of randomized, placebo‐controlled trials
TLDR
Rufinamide is a drug used to treat partial‐onset seizures and seizures associated with Lennox‐Gastaut syndrome in adult and children and there has been no attempt to evaluate systematically the risks of adverse events.
Efficacy of rufinamide in drug-resistant epilepsy: a meta-analysis.
TLDR
Rufinamide was efficacious in doses up to 45 mg/kg daily when provided as adjunctive therapy in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and other drug-resistant epilepsies and further studies are needed to confirm and expand these findings.
Rufinamide as an adjunctive therapy for Lennox–Gastaut syndrome: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial in Japan
TLDR
The present results showed a favorable risk-benefit profile for rufinamide as an adjunctive therapy for patients with LGS and subgroup analyses indicated that the efficacy of ruf inamide was consistent independent of clinical background characteristics.
Rufinamide efficacy and safety as adjunctive treatment in children with focal drug resistant epilepsy: The first Italian prospective study
TLDR
The experience suggests that Rufinamide can be effective in reducing focal seizure frequency in children with drug resistant epilepsy, and that it can be considered as a safe drug.
Rufinamide efficacy and safety in children aged 1–4 years with Lennox–Gastaut syndrome
TLDR
Rufinamide tablets were efficacious and well tolerated in LGS patients aged 1-4 years, at doses up to 1000 mg per day, when given as add-on therapy to other antiepileptic drugs.
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