Rubber Band Ingestion by a Rubbish Dump Dweller, the White Stork (Ciconia ciconia)

@inproceedings{Henry2011RubberBI,
  title={Rubber Band Ingestion by a Rubbish Dump Dweller, the White Stork (Ciconia ciconia)},
  author={Pierre-Yves Henry and G{\'e}rard Wey and Gilles Balança},
  year={2011}
}
Abstract. The health of wildlife can be affected by the ingestion of non-edible, anthropogenic debris that mimic prey. First evidence of localized, massive ingestion of rubber bands is provided for an earthworm consumer, the White Stork (Ciconia ciconia), using nest contents and necropsies recorded in France. In 2003–2004, the prevalence of rubber bands and other debris in nests (N = 227) differed between the nine regions analyzed and decreased as distance from the nearest rubbish dump… 
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