Rover/sitterDrosophila melanogaster larval foraging polymorphism as a function of larval development, food-patch quality, and starvation

Abstract

The genetically based rover/sitter behavioral difference in Drosophila melanogasterlarval foraging is expressed throughout most of the larval instars when larvae forage on food patches of differing food quality. The amount of locomotor behavior decreases when third-instar larvae of both rover and sitter strains are starved just prior to the behavioral test. Such strain differences in locomotor behavior are maintained despite the starvation-induced decrease in locomotion found in both strains. Measurements of larval body length and width, taken at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h posthatching, reveal that rover and sitter larval growth rates do not differ. The finding that rover/sitter differences are expressed in a variety of environments and throughout the majority of the larval instars should aid in attempts to uncover selection pressures which may differentially affect the two morphs in environmentally heterogeneous natural populations.

DOI: 10.1007/BF01068057

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Cite this paper

@article{Graf2005RoversitterDrosophilaML, title={Rover/sitterDrosophila melanogaster larval foraging polymorphism as a function of larval development, food-patch quality, and starvation}, author={Susanne A. Graf and Maria B. Sokolowski}, journal={Journal of Insect Behavior}, year={2005}, volume={2}, pages={301-313} }