Routes to remembering: the brains behind superior memory

@article{Maguire2003RoutesTR,
  title={Routes to remembering: the brains behind superior memory},
  author={E. Maguire and E. Valentine and J. Wilding and N. Kapur},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={90-95}
}
Why do some people have superior memory capabilities? We addressed this age-old question by examining individuals renowned for outstanding memory feats in forums such as the World Memory Championships. Using neuropsychological measures, as well as structural and functional brain imaging, we found that superior memory was not driven by exceptional intellectual ability or structural brain differences. Rather, we found that superior memorizers used a spatial learning strategy, engaging brain… Expand
Superior Memory of Mnemonists and Experts in Various Domains
One of the most striking individual differences between people concerns their ability to recall information and everyday events. This entry reviews the history of research on superior memory ofExpand
Focal cortical thickness correlates of exceptional memory training in Vedic priests
TLDR
This work studies a group of Hindu Vedic priests, whose religious training requires the memorization of vast tracts of scriptural texts through an oral tradition, recalled spontaneously during a lifetime of subsequent spiritual practice. Expand
Neural processes underpinning episodic memory
Episodic memory is the memory for our personal past experiences. Although numerous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies investigating its neural basis have revealed a consistent andExpand
Mnemonic Training Reshapes Brain Networks to Support Superior Memory
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, in a group of naive controls, functional connectivity changes induced by 6 weeks of mnemonic training were correlated with the network organization that distinguishes athletes from controls. Expand
Hippocampal–caudate nucleus interactions support exceptional memory performance
TLDR
These findings suggest that a hippocampal–caudate nucleus cooperation may enable exceptional memory performance and speculate that this cooperation reflects an integration of the two memory systems at issue-enabling optimal combination of stimulus-response learning and map-based learning when using mnemonic strategies. Expand
Does hippocampal volume explain performance differences on hippocampal-dependent tasks?
TLDR
Little evidence that hippocampal grey matter volume was related to task performance in this healthy sample of 217 young, healthy adult participants was found, and hippocampalgrey matter volume may not, therefore, significantly influence performance on tasks known to require the hippocampus in healthy people. Expand
Neural Evidence of Superior Memory: How to Capture Brain Activities of Encoding Processes Underlying Superior Memory
TLDR
A rare opportunity to reproduce and isolate specific neural activities directly associated with exceptional memory is reported, suggesting that the early attention-related encoding processes were reflected in theta and delta whereas the later attention-independent encoding processes was reflected in time-domain slow-wave. Expand
Deconstructing episodic memory with construction
TLDR
It is argued that the process of 'scene construction' is better able to account for the commonalities in the brain areas engaged by an extended range of disparate functions. Expand
Using Imagination to Understand the Neural Basis of Episodic Memory
TLDR
It is concluded that scene construction constitutes a common process underlying episodic memory and imagination of fictitious experiences, and may partially account for the similar brain networks implicated in navigation, episodic future thinking, and the default mode. Expand
Exceptional memorizers: made, not born
In a recent study, Maguire and colleagues failed to find systematic differences in brain anatomy between world-class memory performers and matched control subjects. The world-class performersExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 60 REFERENCES
The Human Hippocampus and Spatial and Episodic Memory
TLDR
A review of neuropsychological, behavioral, and neuroimaging studies of human hippocampal involvement in spatial memory concentrates on three important concepts in this field: spatial frameworks, dimensionality, and orientation and self-motion. Expand
Mental calculation in a prodigy is sustained by right prefrontal and medial temporal areas
TLDR
It is found that the expert could switch between short-term effort-requiring storage strategies and highly efficient episodic memory encoding and retrieval, a process that was sustained by right prefrontal and medial temporal areas. Expand
The efficacy of imagery mnemonics in memory remediation
Training and instructions in the use of mental imagery can lead to improved retention in patients with memory impairment as the result of brain injury or disease. The amount of improvement variesExpand
Dissociating prefrontal and hippocampal function in episodic memory encoding
TLDR
An experiment involving learning category–exemplar word pairs in which the novelty of either individual elements or the entire category– Exemplar pairing is manipulated, demonstrating both left medial temporal and left prefrontal activation and showing that these activations are dissociable with respect to encoding demands. Expand
The effects of bilateral hippocampal damage on fMRI regional activations and interactions during memory retrieval.
TLDR
It is indicated that recruitment of bilateral regions during memory retrieval, and altered patterns of effective connectivity between brain regions may be important indicators of disordered memory. Expand
Skill and Working Memory
Publisher Summary This chapter focuses on the important role of retrieval structures as working memory states. The working memory has at least the following components: (1) short-term memory, whichExpand
The Hippocampus as a Cognitive Map
Table of Contents: Chapter 1 - Remembrance of places past: a history of theories of space / Chapter 2 - Spatial behaviour / Chapter 3 - Anatomy / Chapter 4 - Physiology / Chapter 5 - Introduction toExpand
The retrosplenial contribution to human navigation: a review of lesion and neuroimaging findings.
  • E. Maguire
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Scandinavian journal of psychology
  • 2001
TLDR
While there is strong evidence for right medial temporal lobe involvement in navigation, it now seems that the inputs the hippocampus and related structures receive from and convey to right retrosplenial cortex have a similar spatial preference, while the left medial temporal and left retrosPlenial cortices seem primarily concerned with more general aspects of episodic memory. Expand
Knowing where and getting there: a human navigation network.
TLDR
A network of brain areas that support navigation in humans are outlined and the functions of these regions are linked to physiological observations in other mammals. Expand
Prefrontal-basal ganglia pathways are involved in the learning of arbitrary visuomotor associations: a PET study
TLDR
Findings suggest that the learning process involves a distributed network in the ventral extrastriate and prefrontal cortex, in association with the basal ganglia and the parahippocampal gyrus, which is specifically implicated in learning a visuomotor conditional task. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...