Routes: Alternate Migration Corridors for Early Man in North America

@article{Fladmark1979RoutesAM,
  title={Routes: Alternate Migration Corridors for Early Man in North America},
  author={Knut R. Fladmark},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={1979},
  volume={44},
  pages={55 - 69}
}
  • K. Fladmark
  • Published 1 January 1979
  • Environmental Science
  • American Antiquity
This paper reviews the relative feasibility of interior and coastal routes for early man entering southern North America from Beringia during the late Pleistocene. Paleoenvironmental and archaeological data suggest that a chain of sea-level refugia around the North Pacific coast could have provided a real alternative to the interior “ice-free” corridor and that maritime cultural adaptations may have been among the first to arrive south of Canada. 
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