Rooting for Rewilding: Quantifying Wild Boar's Sus scrofa Rooting Rate in the Scottish Highlands

@article{Sandom2013RootingFR,
  title={Rooting for Rewilding: Quantifying Wild Boar's Sus scrofa Rooting Rate in the Scottish Highlands},
  author={Christopher J. Sandom and Joelene Hughes and David W. Macdonald},
  journal={Restoration Ecology},
  year={2013},
  volume={21}
}
Rewilding is emerging as a promising framework within restoration ecology to help restore ecosystem function through species reintroduction. To manage effectively such projects it is necessary to predict and quantify the interactions between the reintroduced species and their environment. To date, this has not been a priority in restoration ecology. Here, we quantify wild boar's rooting rate at a range of stocking densities to explore their potential to aid the restoration of the Caledonian… 

Rewilding the Scottish Highlands: Do Wild Boar, Sus scrofa, Use a Suitable Foraging Strategy to be Effective Ecosystem Engineers?

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Rewilding the Scottish Highlands: Do Wild Boar, Sus scrofa, Use a Suitable Foraging Strategy to be Effective Ecosystem Engineers?

TLDR
The results indicate that wild boar invested approximately four more hours daily to rooting during the autumn and winter than the spring and summer, which could have important implications for the impacts of boar on vegetation community dynamics.

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