Rontgen's Ghosts: Photography, X-Rays, and the Victorian Imagination

@article{Grove1997RontgensGP,
  title={Rontgen's Ghosts: Photography, X-Rays, and the Victorian Imagination},
  author={Allen W. Grove},
  journal={Literature and Medicine},
  year={1997},
  volume={16},
  pages={141 - 173}
}
Grove examines the way in which Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's 1895 discovery of X-rays confirmed many pre-existing ideas about the existence of ghosts and the way in which the photographic plate could detect realities invisible to the human eye. The arti cle situates Röntgen's discovery within a history of ghost fiction, ghost hunting, and ghost-like photographs. 
Aesthetics of Co-registration: Spirit Photography, X-rays and Cinema
This chapter broadens its focus outward from cinema to examine the supernatural implications of two photographic practices adjacent to cinema: spirit photography and X-ray photography. The chapter
'A new kind of rays': gothic fears, cultural anxieties and the discovery of X-rays in the 1890s
In 1895, the world of modern physics was effectively ushered in with the discovery of X-rays by the German physicist, Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen. X-rays rapidly changed the ways in which the human body
Ghostly Traces, Occult Clues
This essay surveys the porosity of scientific and occult discourses of the Victorian age, and, more specifically, the presence of visual technological apparatuses in occult detective fiction of the
THE INVISIBLE MADE VISIBLE
This article focuses on the early history of X-rays. It argues that, during the first years after their discovery in 1895 by German physicist Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, they were regarded as a
"Looking Radiant": Science, Photography and the X-ray Craze of 1896
Wilhelm Roentgen discovered X-rays in late 1895, and X-rays were immediately popularized in Britain as a new form of special effect photography. During the late nineteenth-century, special effect pho
Coercive Somatographies: X-rays, Hypnosis, and Stanislavsky's Production Plan for The Seagull
This article explores points of contact between Stanislavsky's detailed 1898 mise en scene for the Moscow Art Theatre's production of Chekhov's The Seagull, on the one hand, and discursive practices
Coercive Somatographies: X-rays, Hypnosis, and Stanislavsky's Production Plan for The Seagull
This article explores points of contact between Stanislavsky's detailed 1898 mise en scène for the Moscow Art Theatre's production of Chekhov's The Seagull, on the one hand, and discursive practices
Specular Metamorphoses: Harriet Prescott Spofford’s “The Ray of Displacement”
This paper focuses on Harriet Prescott Spofford’s short story “The Ray of Displacement” which appeared in The Metropolitan Magazine in October 1903. The story deals with a crystal structure and the
Frontispieces and Other Ruins: Portraits of the Author in Henry James's New York Edition
This article explores three "apparitions" of the author-figure in the paratexts (frontispieces and prefaces) of Henry James's New York Edition. These "portraits of the author" are discussed with
Spectral Times: The Ghost Film As Historical Allegory
Spectral Times: The Ghost Film As Historical Allegory Bliss Cua Lim Ghosts call our calendars into question. The temporality of haunting, through which events and people return from the limits of
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 10 REFERENCES
Camera Lucida: Reflections on Photography
Examining the themes of presence and absence, the relationship between photography and theatre, history and death, these 'reflections on photography' begin as an investigation into the nature of
Victorian ghost stories : an Oxford anthology
"The Old Nurse's Story" (1852), Elizabeth Gaskell "An Account of Some Strange Disturbances in Aungier Street" (1853), J.S. Le Fanu "The Miniature" (1853), J.Y. Akerman "The Last House in C--Street"
The Oxford Book of English Ghost Stories
With their evocative settings amid mists and shadows, in ruinous houses, on lonely roads and wild moorlands, in abandoned churches and over-grown gardens, ghost stories have long exercised a
The Wanderings of a Spiritualist
An intensely personal account of Spiritualism by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle--the creator of Sherlock Holmes--written soon after announcing his belief in communication with the dead. Conan Doyle's
The Magic Mountain