Roles of type IV pili, flagellum-mediated motility and extracellular DNA in the formation of mature multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

@article{Barken2008RolesOT,
  title={Roles of type IV pili, flagellum-mediated motility and extracellular DNA in the formation of mature multicellular structures in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.},
  author={Kim Bundvig Barken and S{\"u}nje Johanna Pamp and Liang Yang and Morten Gjermansen and Jacob J. Bertrand and Mikkel Klausen and Michael Givskov and Cynthia B. Whitchurch and Joanne N. Engel and Tim Tolker-Nielsen},
  journal={Environmental microbiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={10 9},
  pages={
          2331-43
        }
}
When grown as a biofilm in laboratory flow chambers Pseudomonas aeruginosa can develop mushroom-shaped multicellular structures consisting of distinct subpopulations in the cap and stalk portions. We have previously presented evidence that formation of the cap portion of the mushroom-shaped structures in P. aeruginosa biofilms occurs via bacterial migration and depends on type IV pili (Mol Microbiol 50: 61-68). In the present study we examine additional factors involved in the formation of this… 

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