Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents

@inproceedings{Nelson2007RolesAR,
  title={Roles and Responsibilities of Speech-Language Pathologists With Respect to Reading and Writing in Children and Adolescents},
  author={Nickola Wolf Nelson and Hugh W. Catts},
  year={2007}
}
These guidelines are an official statement of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). They were approved by ASHA’s Legislative Council on November 18, 2000. They provide guidance for speech-language pathologists in all work settings regarding their roles and responsibilities related to reading and written language disorders in children and adolescents but are not official standards of the Association. Members of the Ad Hoc Committee on Reading and Written Language Disorders… Expand
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