Role of the extracellular polymer matrix in resistance of bacterial biofilms to extreme environmental factors

Abstract

Biofilms of a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria (both environmental strains from the stratal waters of oil fields and collection strains) were found to exhibit higher resistance to extreme physicochemical factors (unfavorable temperature, pH, and salt concentration) than planktonic cultures. The extracellular polymers forming the structure of the biofilm matrix were shown to contribute significantly to this resistance, since suppression of matrix formation by subbacteriostatic concentrations of azithromycin (for Pseudomonas acephalitica) or mutation in the cvil gene encoding N-hexanoyl homoserine lactone synthetase (for Chromobacterium violaceum CV026) resulted in the resistance of biofilms being decreased almost to the level of planktonic cultures. The role of the biofilm matrix for bacterial survival under extreme conditions is discussed.

DOI: 10.1134/S002626171302015X

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Cite this paper

@article{Strelkova2013RoleOT, title={Role of the extracellular polymer matrix in resistance of bacterial biofilms to extreme environmental factors}, author={E. A. Strelkova and Natalia V Pozdnyakova and Marina V Zhurina and Vladimir K Plakunov and Sergey S Belyaev}, journal={Microbiology}, year={2013}, volume={82}, pages={119-125} }