Role of posttranslational modifications in C. elegans and ascaris spermatogenesis and sperm function.

Abstract

Generally, spermatogenesis and sperm function involve widespread posttranslational modification of regulatory proteins in many different species. Nematode spermatogenesis has been studied in detail, mostly by genetic/molecular genetic techniques in the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans and by biochemistry/cell biology in the pig parasite Ascaris suum. Like other nematodes, both of these species produce sperm that use a form of amoeboid motility termed crawling, and many aspects of spermatogenesis are likely to be similar in both species. Consequently, work in these two nematode species has been largely complementary. Work in C. elegans has identified a number of spermatogenesis-defective genes and, so far, 12 encode enzymes that are implicated as catalysts of posttranslational protein modification. Crawling motility involves extension of a single pseudopod and this process is powered by a unique cytoskeleton composed of Major Sperm Protein (MSP) and accessory proteins, instead of the more widely observed actin. In Ascaris, pseudopod extension and crawling motility can be reconstituted in vitro, and biochemical studies have begun to reveal how posttranslational protein modifications, including phosphorylation, dephosphorylation and proteolysis, participate in these processes.

DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-0817-2_10

Cite this paper

@article{Miao2014RoleOP, title={Role of posttranslational modifications in C. elegans and ascaris spermatogenesis and sperm function.}, author={Long Miao and Steven W L'hernault}, journal={Advances in experimental medicine and biology}, year={2014}, volume={759}, pages={215-39} }