Role of outcome conflict in dual-task interference.

@article{Navon1987RoleOO,
  title={Role of outcome conflict in dual-task interference.},
  author={David Navon and J. Miller},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance},
  year={1987},
  volume={13 3},
  pages={
          435-48
        }
}
  • D. Navon, J. Miller
  • Published 1 August 1987
  • Psychology, Biology
  • Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance
The traditional explanation for dual-task interference is that tasks compete for scarce processing resources. Another possible explanation is that the outcome of the processing required for one task conflicts with the processing required for the other task (e.g., cross talk). To explore the contribution of outcome conflict to task interference, we manipulated the relatedness of the tasks. In Experiment 1, subjects searched concurrently for names of boys in one channel and names of cities in… 

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