Role of iron in estrogen-induced cancer.

@article{Liehr2001RoleOI,
  title={Role of iron in estrogen-induced cancer.},
  author={J. Liehr and J. Jones},
  journal={Current medicinal chemistry},
  year={2001},
  volume={8 7},
  pages={
          839-49
        }
}
Redox cycling of catecholestrogen metabolites between quinone and catechol forms is a mechanism of generating potentially mutagenic oxygen radicals in estrogen-induced carcinogenesis. Consistent with this concept, multiple forms of oxygen radical-generated DNA damage are induced by estrogen in cell-free systems, in cells in culture and in rodents prone to estrogen-induced cancer. Metal ions, specifically iron, are necessary for the production of hydroxy radicals. Iron has not received much… Expand
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