Role of cannabis in digestive disorders

@article{Goyal2017RoleOC,
  title={Role of cannabis in digestive disorders},
  author={Hemant Goyal and Umesh Singla and Urvashi Gupta and Elizabeth P. May},
  journal={European Journal of Gastroenterology \& Hepatology},
  year={2017},
  volume={29},
  pages={135–143}
}
  • H. Goyal, U. Singla, E. May
  • Published 1 February 2017
  • Medicine
  • European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Cannabis sativa, a subspecies of the Cannabis plant, contains aromatic hydrocarbon compounds called cannabinoids. [INCREMENT]9-Tetrahydrocannabinol is the most abundant cannabinoid and is the main psychotropic constituent. Cannabinoids activate two types of G-protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors: cannabinoid type 1 receptor and cannabinoid type 2 receptor. There has been ongoing interest and development in research to explore the therapeutic potential of cannabis. [INCREMENT]9… 
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