Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine.

@article{Guerreiro2013RoleOA,
  title={Role of a polymorphism in a Hox/Pax-responsive enhancer in the evolution of the vertebrate spine.},
  author={Isabel Guerreiro and Andreia Nunes and Joost M Woltering and Ana Casaca and Ana N{\'o}voa and T{\^a}nia Vinagre and Margaret E Hunter and Denis Duboule and Moises Mallo},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2013},
  volume={110 26},
  pages={10682-6}
}
Patterning of the vertebrate skeleton requires the coordinated activity of Hox genes. In particular, Hox10 proteins are essential to set the transition from thoracic to lumbar vertebrae because of their rib-repressing activity. In snakes, however, the thoracic region extends well into Hox10-expressing areas of the embryo, suggesting that these proteins are unable to block rib formation. Here, we show that this is not a result of the loss of rib-repressing properties by the snake proteins, but… CONTINUE READING
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Evidence for a myotomal Hox/Myf cascade governing nonautonomous control of rib specification within global vertebral domains

  • T Vinagre
  • Dev Cell 18(4):655–661
  • 2010

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