Role of Opioid Receptors in Bombesin‐induced Grooming a

@article{Gmerek1988RoleOO,
  title={Role of Opioid Receptors in Bombesin‐induced Grooming a},
  author={Debra E. Gmerek and Alan Cowan},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={1988},
  volume={525}
}
  • D. Gmerek, A. Cowan
  • Published 1 May 1988
  • Biology
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Bombesin, a tetradecapeptide originally isolated from the skin of the frog Bombina bombina,’ elicits dose-related excessive grooming when injected centrally in rats2-‘ as well as other specie^.^ The grooming induced by intracerebroventricular (i.cv.) bombesin in rats consists of hindlimb scratching directed primarily at the head and neck, although facial grooming, body washing, nail licking and biting, forepaw tremors, wetdog shakes, and stretching also occur. Bombesin-induced grooming behavior… 

Behavioral Effects of Bombesin a

  • A. Cowan
  • Biology
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 1988
TLDR
Several animal species respond, in a dramatic manner, to the central injection of bombesin, a tetradecapeptide isolated originally from frog skin in 1971,' in rats, the animals display the following syndrome: behavioral activation, forepaw tremors, wet-dog shakes and, most notably, excessive grooming.

Physiological Function of Gastrin-Releasing Peptide and Neuromedin B Receptors in Regulating Itch Scratching Behavior in the Spinal Cord of Mice

TLDR
Spinal GRPr and NMBr independently drive itch neurotransmission in mice and may not mediate bombesin-induced scratching, indicating that the suppression of scratching at higher doses is confounded by motor impairment.

Characterization of scratching responses in rats following centrally administered morphine or bombesin

TLDR
It is demonstrated that morphine and bombesin elicit scratching through different receptor mechanisms, at different central sites, and to different degrees.

Characterization of scratching responses in rats following centrally administered morphine or bombesin

TLDR
It is demonstrated that morphine and bombesin elicit scratching through different receptor mechanisms, at different central sites, and to different degrees.

Opioid receptors (version 2019.4) in the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to Pharmacology Database

TLDR
The human N/OFQ receptor, NOP, is considered 'opioid-related' rather than opioid because, while it exhibits a high degree of structural homology with the conventional opioid receptors, it displays a distinct pharmacology.

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TLDR
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TLDR
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  • P. GilbertW. Martin
  • Biology, Psychology
    The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • 1976
TLDR
Data from the study of morphine-like and nalorphine-like drugs studied in the nondependent, morphine-dependent and cyclazocine-dependent chronic spinal dog are consistent with the hypothesis that there are strong and partial agonists of the mu and kappa types, and further, that physical dependence on morphine and cyclzocine is mediated through different receptors.