Role of Melanopsin in Circadian Responses to Light

@article{Ruby2002RoleOM,
  title={Role of Melanopsin in Circadian Responses to Light},
  author={Norman F. Ruby and Thomas J. Brennan and Xinmin Xie and Vinh H. Cao and Paul Franken and H. Craig Heller and Bruce F. O’Hara},
  journal={Science},
  year={2002},
  volume={298},
  pages={2211 - 2213}
}
Melanopsin has been proposed as an important photoreceptive molecule for the mammalian circadian system. Its importance in this role was tested in melanopsin knockout mice. These mice entrained to a light/dark cycle, phase-shifted after a light pulse, and increased circadian period when light intensity increased. Induction of the immediate-early gene c-fos was observed after a nighttime light pulse in both wild-type and knockout mice. However, the magnitude of these behavioral responses in… 
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