Role of LAG-3 in regulatory T cells.

@article{Huang2004RoleOL,
  title={Role of LAG-3 in regulatory T cells.},
  author={Ching-Tai Huang and Creg J. Workman and Dallas B. Flies and Xiaoyu Pan and Aimee L. Marson and Gang Zhou and Edward L. Hipkiss and Sowmya Ravi and Jeanne Kowalski and Hyam I Levitsky and Jonathan D. Powell and Drew M. Pardoll and Charles G. Drake and Dario A A Vignali},
  journal={Immunity},
  year={2004},
  volume={21 4},
  pages={
          503-13
        }
}
Overview of LAG-3-Expressing, IL-10-Producing Regulatory T Cells.
TLDR
The combined expression of LAG-3 and CD49b identifies IL-10-producing Treg cells in mice and humans more specifically and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic strategies in immune-mediated diseases.
Roles of LAG3 and EGR2 in regulatory T cells
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) participate in the maintenance of tolerance to self-antigens and suppressive control of excessive immune responses to exogenous antigens. A lack or dysfunction of these
LAG-3 regulates CD8+ T cell accumulation and effector function in murine self- and tumor-tolerance systems.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that LAG-3 maintains tolerance to self and tumor antigens via direct effects on CD8+ T cells using 2 murine systems and suggested that L AG-3 blockade may be a potential cancer treatment.
LAG-3 Confers a Competitive Disadvantage upon Antiviral CD8+ T Cell Responses
TLDR
The results indicate that LAG-3 expression by CD8+ T cells inhibits their competitive fitness and results in a slightly reduced rate of cell division in comparison with L AG-3–deficient cells, and this cell-intrinsic effect was consistent across both acute and chronic virus infections.
An IL-27/Lag3 axis enhances Foxp3+ regulatory T cell suppressive function and therapeutic efficacy
TLDR
It is reported that IL-27, an IL-12 family cytokine known to have both pro- and anti inflammatory roles in T cells, plays a pivotal role in enhancing Treg function to control T cell-induced colitis, a model for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in humans.
The inhibitory cytokine IL-35 contributes to regulatory T-cell function
TLDR
IL-35 is identified as a novel inhibitory cytokine that may be specifically produced by Treg cells and is required for maximal suppressive activity.
Natural and expanded CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in bone marrow transplantation.
Identification of a human CD8+ regulatory T cell subset that mediates suppression through the chemokine CC chemokine ligand 4
TLDR
A human CD8+lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3)+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg subset, which suppresses T cells partly through the secretion of CC chemokine ligand 4 (CCL4), which can inhibit T cell activation by interfering with T cell receptor signaling, may play a role in immunoregulation in humans, including infectious diseases.
Lymphocyte Activation Gene 3 (LAG-3) Modulates the Ability of CD4 T-cells to Be Suppressed In Vivo
TLDR
The data suggest that LAG-3 expression on Tconv cells makes them more susceptible to Treg based suppression, and also regulates the development of a TH1 T-cell response, which is critical for homeostatic proliferation in vivo.
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