Role of Exercise Training in the Prevention and Treatment of Insulin Resistance and Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

@article{Ivy1997RoleOE,
  title={Role of Exercise Training in the Prevention and Treatment of Insulin Resistance and Non-Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus},
  author={John L. Ivy},
  journal={Sports Medicine},
  year={1997},
  volume={24},
  pages={321-336}
}
  • J. Ivy
  • Published 1 November 1997
  • Medicine
  • Sports Medicine
SummaryRecent epidemiological studies indicate that individuals who maintain a physically active lifestyle are much less likely to develop impaired glucose tolerance and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Moreover, it was found that the protective effect of physical activity was strongest for individuals at highest risk of developing NIDDM. Reducing the risk of insulin resistance and NIDDM by regularly performed exercise is also supported by several aging studies. It has been… 
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