• Corpus ID: 18027250

Robustness and the Internet: Design and evolution

@inproceedings{Willinger2002RobustnessAT,
  title={Robustness and the Internet: Design and evolution},
  author={Walter Willinger and John C. Doyle},
  year={2002}
}
The objective of this paper is to provide a historical account of the design and evolution of the Internet and use it as a concrete starting point for a scientific exploration of the broader issues of robustness in complex systems. To this end, we argue that anyone interested in complex systems should care about the Internet and its workings, and why anyone interested in the Internet should be concerned about complexity, robustness, fragility, and their trade-offs. 

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