Robust Protocols for Securely Expanding Randomness and Distributing Keys Using Untrusted Quantum Devices

@article{Miller2016RobustPF,
  title={Robust Protocols for Securely Expanding Randomness and Distributing Keys Using Untrusted Quantum Devices},
  author={Carl A. Miller and Yaoyun Shi},
  journal={Journal of the ACM (JACM)},
  year={2016},
  volume={63},
  pages={1 - 63}
}
Randomness is a vital resource for modern-day information processing, especially for cryptography. A wide range of applications critically rely on abundant, high-quality random numbers generated securely. Here, we show how to expand a random seed at an exponential rate without trusting the underlying quantum devices. Our approach is secure against the most general adversaries, and has the following new features: cryptographic level of security, tolerating a constant level of imprecision in… 
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