Robot phonotaxis in the wild: a biologically inspired approach to outdoor sound localization

@article{Horchler2004RobotPI,
  title={Robot phonotaxis in the wild: a biologically inspired approach to outdoor sound localization},
  author={Andrew D. Horchler and Richard E. Reeve and Barbara Webb and Roger D. Quinn},
  journal={Advanced Robotics},
  year={2004},
  volume={18},
  pages={801 - 816}
}
Cricket phonotaxis (sound localization behavior) was implemented on an autonomous outdoor robot platform inspired by cockroach locomotion. This required the integration of a novel robot morphology (Whegs) with a biologically based auditory processing circuit and neural control system, as well as interfacing this to a new tracking device and software architecture for running robot experiments. In repeated tests, the robot is shown to be capable of tracking towards a simulated male cricket song… 

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