Road density and potential impacts on wildlife species such as American moose in mainland Nova Scotia

@inproceedings{Beazley2004RoadDA,
  title={Road density and potential impacts on wildlife species such as American moose in mainland Nova Scotia},
  author={Karen F. Beazley and Tamaini V. Snaith and Frances MacKinnon and David L. Colville},
  year={2004}
}
Habitat conversion, degradation and fragmentation, and the introduction of exotic species are among the primary factors causing the loss of biodiversity. Road density is a valuable indicator of these anthropogenic factors. Deleterious biological effects extend more than 1000 metres from roads, and road density of 0.6 km/km2 has been identified as an apparent threshold value above which natural populations of certain large vertebrates decline. Road density assessments in Nova Scotia indicate… 

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