Riverine barriers and the geographic distribution of Amazonian species.

@article{Gascon2000RiverineBA,
  title={Riverine barriers and the geographic distribution of Amazonian species.},
  author={C. Gascon and J. Malcolm and J. Patton and M. N. D. Da Silva and J. Bogart and S. Lougheed and C. Peres and S. Neckel and P. Boag},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2000},
  volume={97 25},
  pages={
          13672-7
        }
}
  • C. Gascon, J. Malcolm, +6 authors P. Boag
  • Published 2000
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Rivers have been suggested to have played an important role in shaping present-day patterns of ecological and genetic variation among Amazonian species and communities. Recent molecular studies have provided mixed support for the hypothesis that large lowland Amazonian rivers have functioned as significant impediments to gene flow among populations of neotropical species. To date, no study has systematically evaluated the impact that riverine barriers might have on structuring whole Amazonian… Expand
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TLDR
The role of rivers in delineating the ranges of Amazonian primate species is investigated and the extent to which differences in river size affect he chance that rivers will coincide withPrimate species' boundaries is investigated; and differences in the body size of primates influence the chance that they will occur on both sides of different rivers. Expand
Riverine barriers and gene flow in Amazonian saddle-back tamarins.
TLDR
It is argued that in the case of plant and animal species that are largely restricted to unflooded forests, such as tamarins, seasonally flooded forest can operate as a critical additional barrier to between-bank gene flow. Expand
Patterns of Genetic Population Differentiation in Four Species of Amazonian Frogs: A Test of the Riverine Barrier Hypothesis1
TLDR
Results were largely driven by substantial differentiation at one or a few collecting localities rather than by basin-wide patterns of riverine differentiation, and patterns of geographic variation are probably more consistent with the idea of this region being a zone of secondary contact. Expand
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We suggest here that large-scale natural forest disturbance and primary succession in the lowland rainforests of the Peruvian Amazon is caused by lateral erosion and channel changes of meanderingExpand
GENE GENEALOGY AND DIFFERENTIATION AMONG ARBOREAL SPINY RATS (RODENTIA: ECHIMYIDAE) OF THE AMAZON BASIN: A TEST OF THE RIVERINE BARRIER HYPOTHESIS
TLDR
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MAMMALS OF THE RIO JURUÁ AND THE EVOLUTIONARY AND ECOLOGICAL DIVERSIFICATION OF AMAZONIA
TLDR
It is shown that, while there are few examples of taxa for which the Rio Juruá is apparently a barrier, most taxa either are largely undifferentiated throughout the basin or are sharply divided into reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA haplotype clades separable into upriver and downriver units. Expand
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Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b sequence data from a dart–poison frog were used to test two hypotheses of Amazonian diversification: the riverine barrier and the ridge hypotheses, and results were consistent with the hypothesis that ancient ridges (arches) have shaped the phylogeographic relationships of Amazonians. Expand
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