Risky Business: Emotion, Decision-Making, and Addiction

@article{Bechara2004RiskyBE,
  title={Risky Business: Emotion, Decision-Making, and Addiction},
  author={Antoine Bechara},
  journal={Journal of Gambling Studies},
  year={2004},
  volume={19},
  pages={23-51}
}
  • A. Bechara
  • Published 2004
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Gambling Studies
Although metabolic abnormalities in the orbitofrontal cortex have been observed in substance dependent individuals (SDI) for several years, very little attention was paid to the role of this brain region in addiction. However, patients with damage to the ventromedial (VM) sector of the prefrontal cortex and SDI show similar behaviors. (1) They often deny, or they are not aware, that they have a problem. (2) When faced with a choice to pursue a course of action that brings an immediate reward at… Expand
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Nature Neuroscience
  • 2005
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Control of craving by the prefrontal cortex
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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