Risk perception in toxicology--part I: moving beyond scientific instincts to understand risk perception.

@article{Ropeik2011RiskPI,
  title={Risk perception in toxicology--part I: moving beyond scientific instincts to understand risk perception.},
  author={David P Ropeik},
  journal={Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology},
  year={2011},
  volume={121 1},
  pages={1-6}
}
Information from the study of toxins by hard sciences like toxicology is interpreted based on affective, emotional, and instinctive psychologic cues discovered by social science. Understanding and respecting these soft science insights can help toxicologists better communicate their work and findings and have greater influence on the choices of individuals and policy makers. 

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