Risk of Venous Thromboembolism During the Postpartum Period: A Systematic Review

@article{Jackson2011RiskOV,
  title={Risk of Venous Thromboembolism During the Postpartum Period: A Systematic Review},
  author={Emily Jackson and Kathryn M Curtis and Mary Eluned Gaffield},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={117},
  pages={691-703}
}
OBJECTIVE: To determine, from the literature, the risk of venous thromboembolism during the postpartum period. DATA SOURCES: We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library databases for all articles (in all languages) published in peer-reviewed journals from database inception through May 2010 for evidence related to incidence of venous thromboembolism in postpartum women. METHODS OF STUDY SELECTION: We included studies reporting relative risk, incidence rate, or cumulative incidence of venous… Expand
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