Risk factors of vertebral fractures in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

@article{MendozaPinto2009RiskFO,
  title={Risk factors of vertebral fractures in women with systemic lupus erythematosus},
  author={Claudia Mendoza-Pinto and Mario Garc{\'i}a-Carrasco and Hilda Sandoval-Cruz and Margarita Mu{\~n}{\'o}z-Guarneros and Ricardo O Esc{\'a}rcega and Mario Jim{\'e}nez-Hern{\'a}ndez and Pamela Mungu{\'i}a-Realpozo and M. V. H. Sandoval-Cruz and Margarita Delez{\'e}-Hinojosa and Aurelio L{\'o}pez-Colombo and Ricard Cervera},
  journal={Clinical Rheumatology},
  year={2009},
  volume={28},
  pages={579-585}
}
The aim of the current study was to analyze the role of traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related risk factors in the development of vertebral fractures. A cross-sectional study was performed in women with SLE attending a single center. A vertebral fracture was defined as a reduction of at least 20% of vertebral body height. Two hundred ten patients were studied, with median age of 43 years and median disease duration of 72 months. Osteopenia was present in 50.3% of patients… 

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