Risk factors for negative experiences during psychotherapy

@article{Hardy2019RiskFF,
  title={Risk factors for negative experiences during psychotherapy},
  author={Gillian E. Hardy and Lindsey Bishop-Edwards and Eleni Chambers and Janice Connell and Kim Dent-Brown and Gemma Kothari and Rachel O'Hara and Glenys Parry},
  journal={Psychotherapy Research},
  year={2019},
  volume={29},
  pages={403 - 414}
}
ABSTRACT Background: It is estimated that between 3% and 15% of patients have a negative experience of psychotherapy, but little is understood about this. Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with patients’ negative therapy experiences. Method: The data comprised 185 patient and 304 therapist questionnaires, 20 patient and 20 therapist interviews. Patients reported on an unhelpful or harmful experience of therapy, and therapists on a therapy where they thought… 
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