Risk factors for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva and vagina—Population‐based case–control study in Denmark

@article{Madsen2008RiskFF,
  title={Risk factors for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva and vagina—Population‐based case–control study in Denmark},
  author={Birgitte Schütt Madsen and Helle L. Jensen and Adriaan J. C. van den Brule and Jan Wohlfahrt and Morten Frisch},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2008},
  volume={122}
}
The etiology of vulvar and vaginal squamous cell carcinoma (VV‐SCC) has received little attention. A total of 182 women with invasive VV‐SCC (116 with VV‐SCCvulva, 66 with VV‐SCCvagina), 164 uterine corpus cancer controls and 518 population controls were interviewed in a population‐based case–control study in Denmark, and 87 (48%) of the VV‐SCC cases had tissue samples examined for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA using the GP5+/6+ PCR‐EIA assay and subsequent reverse line blotting for HPV typing… Expand
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