Risk factors for gastroschisis.

@article{Goldbaum1990RiskFF,
  title={Risk factors for gastroschisis.},
  author={Gary M. Goldbaum and Janet R. Daling and Samuel Milham},
  journal={Teratology},
  year={1990},
  volume={42 4},
  pages={
          397-403
        }
}
The prevalence at birth of gastroschisis, a rare abnormality of the abdominal wall, appears to have increased over the past decade. To characterize risk factors that might explain this increase, birth certificates for Washington State residents were compared for 62 infants born with gastroschisis during the years 1984 to 1987 and 617 randomly selected unaffected infants matched for birth year. After simultaneously adjusting for 14 potential risk factors, 4 factors stood out. Infants born during… Expand
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References

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Perinatal Management of Gastroschisis
TLDR
Scheduled cesarean delivery at 36 weeks, after confirmation of fetal lung maturity, presents the infant to the pediatric surgeon under controlled conditions and shortens neonatal hospital stay. Expand
Epidemiological study of gastroschisis and omphalocele in Spain.
TLDR
Maternal vaginal bleeding, gestational age, and birth weight were significantly different between gastroschisis and omphaloceles and the controls, and Mortality within the first 3 days of life was significantly higher in gastrosChisis, syndromic omphalosceles, and those associated with other malformations when compared to controls. Expand
Gastroschisis and omphalocele in Finland in the 1970s: prevalence at birth and its correlates.
TLDR
The apparent increase in prevalence of gastroschisis at birth was noted for northern Finland only, while for southern Finland the prevalence has been stable during the 1970s, possibly suggesting diagnostic or reporting differences between various parts of the country. Expand
Omphalocele and gastroschisis. Trends in survival across two decades.
TLDR
During the decade from July 1970 through June 1980, 57 patients with omphalocele and 64 with gastroschisis were treated at the Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles, and the mortality was not significantly different between patients with an abdominal wall defect smaller than 4 cm and those with a larger defect. Expand
Gastroschisis and Omphalocele An Eight‐year Review
TLDR
Until recently confusion has existed concerning the clinical features and surgical treatment of gastroschisis and omphalocele, and in patients without cardiac or chromosomal defects the survival rate was 94%. Expand
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TLDR
A review was made of the obstetric management of 112 infants with abdominal wall defects who were admitted to a neonatal surgical unit, and elective cesarean section does not seem to be justified. Expand
Familial occurrence of gastroschisis. Four new cases and review of the literature.
TLDR
The pedigree of one of the families suggests that gastroschisis may be a severe expression of umbilical hernia or other abdominal wall defects, and a family history of abdominal wall defect may increase the risk for gastrosChisis. Expand
Perinatal aspects of omphalocele and gastroschisis.
TLDR
Ventral defects warrant a careful anatomical and clinical differentiation, and in the case of omphalocele, a thorough search for other anomalies. Expand
An epidemiologic study of congenital malformations of the anterior abdominal wall in more than half a million consecutive live births.
The records of an ongoing health surveillance registry that utilizes multiple sources of ascertainment were used to study the incidence rate of congenital malformations of the anterior abdominal wallExpand
Secular rates and correlates for gastroschisis in California (1968-1977).
TLDR
An epidemiological investigation of gastroschisis using birth certificate data from California for the period of 1968-1977 indicated a clear upward secular trend with the rate per 1,000 increasing from .006 in 1968 to .089 by 1977. Expand
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