Risk factors for autism: perinatal factors, parental psychiatric history, and socioeconomic status.

@article{Larsson2005RiskFF,
  title={Risk factors for autism: perinatal factors, parental psychiatric history, and socioeconomic status.},
  author={Heidi Jeanet Larsson and William W. Eaton and Kreesten Meldgaard Madsen and Mogens Vestergaard and Anne Vingaard Olesen and Esben Agerbo and Diana Schendel and Poul Bak Thorsen and Preben Bo Mortensen},
  journal={American journal of epidemiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={161 10},
  pages={
          916-25; discussion 926-8
        }
}
Research suggests that heredity and early fetal development play a causal role in autism. This case-control study explored the association between perinatal factors, parental psychiatric history, socioeconomic status, and risk of autism. The study was nested within a cohort of all children born in Denmark after 1972 and at risk of being diagnosed with autism until December 1999. Prospectively recorded data were obtained from nationwide registries in Denmark. Cases totaled 698 children with a… 

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Larsson HJ, Eaton WW, Madsen KM, et al . Risk factors for autism: perinatal factors, parental psychiatric history, and socioeconomic status. Am J Epidemiol 2005;161:916–25.
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