Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill: A nested case–control study*

@article{Vlaar2010RiskFA,
  title={Risk factors and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in the critically ill: A nested case–control study*},
  author={Alexander P. J. Vlaar and Jan M. Binnekade and David J. Prins and Dani{\"e}lle van Stein and Jorrit Jan Hofstra and Marcus J. Schultz and Nicole P. Juffermans},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={38},
  pages={771-778}
}
Objectives:To determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcome of transfusion-related acute lung injury in a cohort of critically ill patients. Design:In a retrospective cohort study, patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury were identified using the consensus criteria of acute lung injury within 6 hrs after transfusion. Inclusion criterion was a length of intensive care unit admission >48 hrs. Patients developing transfusion-related acute lung injury were matched (on age, sex, and… 
Transfusion-related acute lung injury in cardiac surgery patients is characterized by pulmonary inflammation and coagulopathy: A prospective nested case-control study*
TLDR
Prior to onset of transfusion-related acute lung injury, there is systemic inflammation and neutrophil sequestration, characterized by both systemic and pulmonary inflammation and activation of neutrophils, as well as enhanced coagulation and suppressed fibrinolysis.
Prospective Study on the Clinical Course and Outcomes in Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury*
TLDR
Transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition resembling the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and was associated with substantial in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients with transfusion- related acute Lung Injury compared with transfused controls.
Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) Occurrence, Risk Factors, and Outcome: A Nested Case- Control Study
TLDR
The need for further population-based investigations in the inpatient hospital setting to assess the effects of aging, health conditions, and other potential risk factors on TRALI occurrence is suggested.
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TLDR
It is suggested that host- related risk factors play a more important role in the occurrence and development of TRALI than blood transfusion-related risk factors.
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TLDR
Aspirin did not protect against transfusion‐related acute lung injury in this cohort of critically ill patients and adjustment for confounding variables using propensity scoring did not affect the risk of acquiring transfusion-related acute Lung injury.
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TLDR
ILD was an independent risk factor for the development ofTRALI and physicians should be aware of the increased risk of TRALI in patients with ILD, according to a multivariable conditional logistic regression analysis.
Early intravenous unfractionated heparin and outcome in acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome – a retrospective propensity matched cohort study
TLDR
Administration of therapeutic doses of intravenous unfractionated heparin was not associated with reduced mortality in critically ill patients diagnosed with ALI, and Heparin treatment did not increase transfusion requirements.
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TLDR
A significant percentage of ED blood product transfusions are discordant with guideline recommendations, however, there was no association with ED transfusion and worse clinical outcome.
The Epidemiology of Transfusion-related Acute Lung Injury Varies According to the Applied Definition of Lung Injury Onset Time.
TLDR
The epidemiology of TRALi varies when applying two plausible definitions of acute respiratory distress syndrome onset time to severely injured trauma patients, and a TRALI definition that standardizes acute respiratory respiratory distress Syndrome onset time might improve reliability and align efforts to understand epidemiology, biology, and prevention.
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