Risk factors, time course and treatment effect for restenosis after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty of chronic total occlusion.

@article{Ellis1989RiskFT,
  title={Risk factors, time course and treatment effect for restenosis after successful percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty of chronic total occlusion.},
  author={Stephen G. Ellis and Richard E. Shaw and Gary Gershony and R G Thomas and Gary S. Roubin and John S. Douglas and Eric J. Topol and S H Startzer and Richard K. Myler and Spencer B. Iii King},
  journal={The American journal of cardiology},
  year={1989},
  volume={63 13},
  pages={
          897-901
        }
}

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