Risk Factors for Osteoporosis Related to their Outcome: Fractures

@article{vanderVoort2001RiskFF,
  title={Risk Factors for Osteoporosis Related to their Outcome: Fractures},
  author={Danny J M van der Voort and Piet P. Geusens and Geert-Jan Dinant},
  journal={Osteoporosis International},
  year={2001},
  volume={12},
  pages={630-638}
}
Abstract. The aim of the study was to determine to what extent easy obtainable bone mineral density (BMD)-related risk factors are associated with the occurrence of fractures and to what extent changes in these determinants during a patient”s lifetime are relevant. A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out on 4725 postmenopausal women, 50–80 years of age, registered with 23 general practitioners (GPs). The women were questioned and examined. BMD of the lumbar spine was measured… Expand
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