Risk Factors for Legal Induced Abortion–Related Mortality in the United States

@article{Bartlett2004RiskFF,
  title={Risk Factors for Legal Induced Abortion–Related Mortality in the United States},
  author={L. Bartlett and C. Berg and H. Shulman and Suzanne B. Zane and C. A. Green and S. Whitehead and H. Atrash},
  journal={Obstetrics \& Gynecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={103},
  pages={729-737}
}
OBJECTIVE: To assess risk factors for legal induced abortion–related deaths. METHODS: This is a descriptive epidemiologic study of women dying of complications of induced abortions. Numerator data are from the Abortion Mortality Surveillance System. Denominator data are from the Abortion Surveillance System, which monitors the number and characteristics of women who have legal induced abortions in the United States. Risk factors examined include age of the woman, gestational length of pregnancy… Expand
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