Rigidity of the magic pentagram game

@article{Kalev2018RigidityOT,
  title={Rigidity of the magic pentagram game},
  author={Amir Kalev and Carl A. Miller},
  journal={Quantum Science and Technology},
  year={2018},
  volume={3}
}
A game is rigid if a near-optimal score guarantees, under the sole assumption of the validity of quantum mechanics, that the players are using an approximately unique quantum strategy. Rigidity has a vital role in quantum cryptography as it permits a strictly classical user to trust behavior in the quantum realm. This property can be traced back as far as 1998 (Mayers and Yao) and has been proved for multiple classes of games. In this paper we prove ridigity for the magic pentagram game, a… 

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