Right inferior frontal cortex: addressing the rebuttals

@inproceedings{Aron2014RightIF,
  title={Right inferior frontal cortex: addressing the rebuttals},
  author={Adam R. Aron and T W Robbins and Russell A. Poldrack},
  booktitle={Front. Hum. Neurosci.},
  year={2014}
}
We recently provided an updated theory of the role of posterior ventral right inferior frontal cortex (hereafter rIFC) in inhibitory response control (Aron et al., 2014). We claimed that when rIFC is triggered by a stop signal, unexpected event or endogenous rule, it engages a brake; i.e., it slows, pauses, or completely stops an action via one or more rIFC-based fronto-basal-ganglia networks. 

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