Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- and sentence-level context: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

@article{Coulson2005RightHS,
  title={Right hemisphere sensitivity to word- and sentence-level context: evidence from event-related brain potentials.},
  author={Seana Coulson and Kara D. Federmeier and Cyma Van Petten and Marta Kutas},
  journal={Journal of experimental psychology. Learning, memory, and cognition},
  year={2005},
  volume={31 1},
  pages={129-47}
}
Researchers using lateralized stimuli have suggested that the left hemisphere is sensitive to sentence-level context, whereas the right hemisphere (RH) primarily processes word-level meaning. The authors investigated this message-blind RH model by measuring associative priming with event-related brain potentials (ERPs). For word pairs in isolation, associated words elicited more positive ERPs than unassociated words with similar magnitudes and onset latencies in both visual fields. Embedded in… CONTINUE READING
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